Feed aggregator

Stink bug traps may increase damage to tomato fruits

ScienceDaily Botany News - Tue, 03/25/2014 - 11:15
Entomologists suggest that stink bug traps in the garden may actually increase stink bug damage to tomatoes. The researchers asked 15 gardeners to place stink bug traps at the ends of rows of tomatoes, while another group of 14 placed no traps in their gardens. Both groups experienced nearly the same amount of stink bugs on the tomato plants themselves, but the the abundance of stink bugs on the tomato fruits was marginally greater in the gardens with traps, and the fruits sustained significantly more injury than tomato fruits grown in gardens without traps.

Southeast Missouri couple passes hummingbird torch

News from the MDC - Tue, 03/25/2014 - 10:05
Written By:  Jim Low

Jim and Judy Ainsworth used to go through 700 pounds of sugar a year. Now they hope others will take up the slack.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. – When hummingbirds arrive in the area of Cape Girardeau this spring, they will be looking for new friends to visit.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

Sugar, not oil: New possibilities for isobutene from wood sugar

ScienceDaily Botany News - Tue, 03/25/2014 - 08:48
No more oil – renewable raw materials are the future. This motto not only applies to biodiesel, but also to isobutene, a basic product used in the chemical industry. In a pilot plant researchers now want to obtain isobutene from sugar instead of oil for the first time. And in order not to threaten food supplies, in the long term the sugar should come from wood or straw and not from sugar beet.

Studying crops, from outer space

ScienceDaily Botany News - Mon, 03/24/2014 - 14:40
Plants convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy during a process called photosynthesis. This energy is passed on to humans and animals that eat the plants, and thus photosynthesis is the primary source of energy for all life on Earth. New work uses a breakthrough in satellite technology to measure light that is emitted by plant leaves as a byproduct of photosynthesis from space.

Molecular clue to complex mystery of auxin signaling in plants

ScienceDaily Botany News - Mon, 03/24/2014 - 14:39
Plants fine-tune the response of their cells to the potent plant hormone auxin by means of large families of proteins that either step on the gas or put on the brake in auxin’s presence. Scientists have learned that one of these proteins, a transcription factor, has an interaction region that, like a button magnet, has a positive and negative face. Because of this domain, the protein can bind two other proteins or even chains of proteins arranged back-to-front.

Discover nature with webcam of peregrine falcons nesting

News from the MDC - Mon, 03/24/2014 - 11:50
Written By:  Joe Jerek

The birds are back! MDC, Ameren Missouri, and World Bird Sanctuary again partner on video feed of falcons nesting in St. Louis area.

ST. LOUIS, Mo. — Like swallows returning to Capistrano, a pair of peregrine falcons has again returned to a nesting box at Ameren Missouri's Sioux Energy Center in the St. Louis area. Through a cooperative effort, Ameren Missouri, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), and the World Bird Sanctuary (WBS) are providing the public with a third year of their online “FalconCam” for a bird’s-eye view of the peregrine falcons raising their chicks.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

Help stop arson wildfires

News from the MDC - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 16:47
Written By:  Bill Graham

Clinton, Mo. – Wildfires that authorities believe were set by arsonists caused damage and danger in Henry and St. Clair counties in recent weeks, said Josh Shroyer, a Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) resource forester based in Clinton. MDC helps community fire departments battle wildfires. In the past week, 20 fires suspected to have been caused by arson have occurred on public and private land near the Harry S Truman Reservoir in Henry County, Shroyer said.

Key Messages: 

We work with you and for you to sustain healthy forests, fish and wildlife.

read more

Permafrost thaw exacerbates climate change

ScienceDaily Botany News - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 15:48
Growing season gains do not offset carbon emissions from permafrost thaw, new research shows. Permafrost contains three to seven times the amount of carbon sequestered in tropical forests. The warming climate threatens to thaw permafrost, which will result in the release of carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere creating feedbacks to climate change -- more warming and greater permafrost thaw.

Bash Trash in April with MDC and MoDOT Annual Trash Bash

News from the MDC - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 15:07
Written By:  MDC and MoDOT

Do spring cleaning outdoors and help fight litter through annual No MOre Trash! Bash during April.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Missourians from every corner of the state are asked to do spring cleaning outdoors and help fight litter through the state’s annual No MOre Trash! Bash throughout the month of April. The Trash Bash is sponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) as part of their ongoing No MOre Trash! statewide anti-litter campaign.

Key Messages: 

We work with you and for you to sustain healthy forests, fish and wildlife.

read more

Annual Wetlands for Kids Day set for April 5

News from the MDC - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 14:37
Written By:  Dan Zarlenga

ST. CHARLES, Mo. — Special places that help clean water, reduce flooding, and provide homes to fascinating plants and animals are worth celebrating. They can be a lot of fun too.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

Unique chromosomes preserved in Swedish fossil

ScienceDaily Botany News - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 09:17
Researchers have made a unique discovery in a well-preserved fern that lived 180 million years ago. Both undestroyed cell nuclei and individual chromosomes have been found in the plant fossil, thanks to its sudden burial in a volcanic eruption.

Celebrate MO trees during Arbor Days in April

News from the MDC - Fri, 03/21/2014 - 08:57
Written By:  Joe Jerek

Trees Work in so many ways for our health, wealth, environment, and happiness.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – In the country, suburbs, cities, and all across Missouri, trees and forests are valuable to our health, wealth, environment, and happiness. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) encourages all Missourians to celebrate the value of Missouri trees and forests on Arbor Days in April by planting native trees and practicing proper tree care.

Key Messages: 

We work with you and for you to sustain healthy forests, fish and wildlife.

read more

MDC offers Discover Nature Girls Camp at SEMO Youth Camp

News from the MDC - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 12:54
Written By:  Candice Davis

This free, three-day, two-night experience is aimed at introducing girls ages 11 to 15 to outdoor skills in a supportive learning environment.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. -- The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) will offer a Discover Nature Girls Camp in southeast Missouri July 15-17 at Camp SEMO in Wappapello.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

MDC Runge Nature Center to host turkey hunting program

News from the MDC - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 12:40
Written By:  Joanie Straub

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Discover nature and get ready for spring turkey season at the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) Runge Conservation Nature Center’s program, "Intro to Turkey Hunting," from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on March 29. This program is free and open to all ages, but registration by March 27 is required.

MDC staff will cover wild turkey biology, proper clothing to wear while turkey hunting, scouting, methods of hunting, and tips for a safe and successful turkey hunt.

Key Messages: 

Conservation makes Missouri a great place to hunt and fish.

read more

MDC Runge Nature Center hosting Wings over Water

News from the MDC - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 12:12
Written By:  Joanie Straub

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Discover nature and learn more about eagles, owls, and falcons at Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) Runge Nature Center’s Wings over Water watershed education program from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on April 24.

Staff from the World Bird Sanctuary will tell the story of these amazing birds, and fly them over the audience, dramatically illustrating the importance of protecting the birds, their habitat, and Missouri’s water resources. The program is free and open to the public.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

Dogwoods, redbuds could bloom early this year

News from the MDC - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 11:18
Written By:  Jim Low

Accelerated tree blooming could reduce the length of spring allergy season.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – With anything resembling normal weather, Missouri could see dogwood and redbud blossoms earlier than usual this year. But all bets are off if the thermometer continues the yo-yo behavior seen over the past month.

Nick Kuhn, forestry field programs supervisor for the Missouri Department of Conservation, says extremely cold weather can actually cause flowering trees to blossom earlier than they might under more normal conditions.

Key Messages: 

We help people discover nature.

read more

Ocean's carbon budget balanced: Supply of food to midwater organisms balanced with demands for food

ScienceDaily Botany News - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 10:58
Ocean scientists have, for the first time successfully balanced the supply of food to midwater organisms with their demands for this food. The depth at which they consume this sinking material regulates our climate by determining how much carbon is stored by the ocean and how much remains in the atmosphere. The study in the North Atlantic focuses on 'marine snow' -- bacteria, microscopic animals and sinking organic matter.

Excessive deer populations hurt native plant biodiversity

ScienceDaily Botany News - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 10:19
There is a link between disruption of the native animal community and invasion by non-native plant species, according to new research, and a co-author of a new study suggests that "similar links maybe found in other ecosystems between disrupted fauna and declining diversity of flora." Deer density in the U.S. is about four to 10 times what it was prior to European settlement of North America, and the researchers make a link between this and the declining plant biodiversity in some regions.

Inhibition of oral biofilm, cell-cell communication using natural-products derivatives

ScienceDaily Botany News - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 09:15
Many plant metabolites and structurally similar derivatives have been identified as inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). Previously, the researchers of this study demonstrated biofilm and QS inhibition using modified cysteines, similar to those produced by the tropical plant Petiveria alliacea. In this study the researchers expanded their compound library to examine structure-activity relationships for biofilm and QS inhibition.

First evidence of plants evolving weaponry to compete in the struggle for selection

ScienceDaily Botany News - Thu, 03/20/2014 - 09:13
Rutting stags and clawing bears are but two examples of male animals fighting over a mate, but new research has uncovered the first evidence of similar male struggles leading to the evolution of weaponry in plants.
Syndicate content (C01 _th3me_)